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  Questions & Tips at ESM Techclinic
9/10/2006Roger van Tongeren

Today I organised a Techclinic at the ESM. During the clinic there were some questions and tips:

1. Linear accelarations
There was a question about if it is necessary to delete spikes when the linear speed is over 1.0 m/s? This is not necessary, because it has more to do with 1.0G-force. It is not possible for a windsurfer to experience more than 1G and that is 9.8 m/s. So in general when the linear speed is higher than 10 m/s you will most likely see a spike in your track

2. Removing spikes in GPSAR
It is possible to remove spikes in the Track list in GPSAR by using the backspace. You can sort on the speeds, select a trackpoint and delete the trackpoint by using the backspace.

3. Split tracks
When you need to split a track, you make sure the timebar is at the time/date you want to split the track. Then select the track in the topright box and select 'split' as one of the options below the topright box.




9/12/2006Anthony Del Balso

Roger,
Regarding the linear accelerations point. How has it been determined a windsurfer cannot experience more than 1G?

I believe I've been subject more than that, in a negative linear acceleration (ie deceleration). Going from in the straps at probably 28 knots, blown out of my straps in a gust and over the nose, and then slowed to zero in a split second as the sail hits the water and pulls hard on the harness.

28 knots is 14 m/s, perhaps it took a full second to come to a stop, so that would be 14m/s^2 linear acceleration.

9/12/2006Andrew Daff

Anthony, I think we can all relate to your senario. ;-)

It is certainly possible to get decelleration exceeding 1G in a crash. I am sure Roger was referring to acceleration driven by the wind and sailing out of it in control. ;-)
9/12/2006Anthony Del Balso

Roger,
Regarding the linear accelerations point. How has it been determined a windsurfer cannot experience more than 1G?

I believe I've been subject more than that, in a negative linear acceleration (ie deceleration). Going from in the straps at probably 28 knots, blown out of my straps in a gust and over the nose, and then slowed to zero in a split second as the sail hits the water and pulls hard on the harness.

28 knots is 14 m/s, perhaps it took a full second to come to a stop, so that would be 14m/s^2 linear acceleration.

   
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